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Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | History

6 edition of Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples found in the catalog.

Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

an assessment of data sources

by

  • 389 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in Canberra .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aboriginal Australians -- Drug use,
  • Aboriginal Australians -- Drug use -- Statistics

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[authors: Louise York ... [et al.]].
    GenreStatistics.
    SeriesDrug statistics series -- no. 17, Drug statistics series -- no. 17.
    ContributionsYork, Louise., Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDU123.4 .D78 2006
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 172 p. ;
    Number of Pages172
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16865670M
    ISBN 10174024608X
    LC Control Number2008371558

    Our Reconciliation Action Plan aims to raise awareness and acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, including their histories and cultures. We continue to work to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are prioritised across the . Indigenous Australians are people who are descended from groups that lived in Australia and surrounding islands before British include the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia. The term Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is preferred by many; First Nations of Australia, First Peoples of Australia and First Australians are also increasingly.


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Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples Download PDF EPUB FB2

Publisher Description This review provides detailed information on the extent of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including overall self-reported prevalence and prevalence by type of substance.

Australian Institute of Health and WelfareDrug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: an assessment of Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples book sources, AIHW, Canberra.

Get citations as. data in Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: an assessment of data use issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia, and set out options There are difficulties in collecting reliable information about substance use among Australians, particularly in relation to the use of illicit.

This report is a companion to the National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund (NDLERF) project, The policing implications of cannabis, amphetamine and other illicit drug use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities (Delahunty and Putt b).

The main purpose of both pieces of research was to contribute to police service. Review of Illicit Drug Use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people do not use illicit drugs, but the proportion of drug use is higher among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than among non-Indigenous people [3, 4].

Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; in The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the prevalence of substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as the use of services for substance abuse.

The report will focus on Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples book main categories of substance that have major health implications for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: tobacco.

The challenges of substance misuse among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australian custody have been highlighted previously. However, this study has, for the first time, articulated the prevalence, type, co-occurrence and correlates of clinical substance use disorder diagnosis in a systematically surveyed by: 4.

Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples book people; in19% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over reported having recently  1 used cannabis [ 5, 6 ].

Torres Strait Islander Peoples Complementary Action Plan – provides the framework for reducing harms caused by alcohol, tobacco and illicit substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These strategies are currently being updated (MCDS ). Review of the harmful use of alcohol among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people Dennis Gray, Kimberly Cartwright, Anna Stearne, Sherry Saggers, Edward Wilkes and Mandy Wilson Introduction The focus Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples book this review is not simply on the use of alcohol.

Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous peopleFile Size: KB. The Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands and waters of Australia and the Torres Strait.

We respect all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—their customs and their beliefs. We also pay our respects to Elders past and present, with particular acknowledgement to the Whadjuk people of.

A bibliography of drug use and related problems among Australian Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (Australian Institute of Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health series) [English, Bruce] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

A bibliography of drug use and related problems among Australian Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (Australian Institute of Health. 1 day ago  The belief among policy makers was that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are ‘better off’ in urban centres.

Now we’re being told it’s easier to keep us safe on Country. Marijuana, hashish or cannabis resin was the most commonly reported illicit drug used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the last 12 months at 24% (% of.

Illicit drug use is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. The purpose of the review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of key information for people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in Australia.

The eBook is the review in another dynamic format. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have higher levels of pre-existing illness than most other population groups in Australia due to our relative social and economic disadvantage.

The shameful legacy of this country’s lingering inability to close the gap in healthcare equity for our people means we are susceptible to more severe. Published on This animated infographic provides an audio visual representation about illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

It was produced. Get this from a library. Drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: an assessment of data sources. [Louise York; Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.]. Prison entrants commonly have a history of problematic alcohol and other drug (AoD) use. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are vastly overrepresented in Australian prisons with an incarceration rate 16 times that of non-Indigenous Australians.

Relatively little attention has been given to the patterns of AoD use among prison entrants and we hypothesise that Cited by: 5. Risky levels of alcohol and other drug use contribute to a range of harms for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for both individuals and the community [] [].

Alcohol and other drug use not only impacts on the physical and mental health of individuals but also affects the care of children, family safety and community wellbeing.

Book. Full-text available was the National Drug Strategy Household Survey Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples illicit drug use among Indigenous people. The video is based on the Review of the harmful use of alcohol among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Information covered includes: *prevalence of alcohol use among Aboriginal and.

Introduction and how to use this book Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander alcohol and drug work happens all over Australia. So, too, the people who helped to write this book come from a range of backgrounds and experiences, from cities through to small isolated communities.

The editors comeFile Size: 2MB. The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands and waters of Australia and the Torres Strait. We respect all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people—their customs and their beliefs.

We also pay our respects to Elders past and present, with particular acknowledgement to the Whadjuk people of the Nyoongar nation, the traditional owners of the. among Indigenous people than among non-Indigenous people in Australia – almost double the national rate. 1 Tobacco is also ingested in conjunction with cannabis.2 Torres Strait Islanders are signifi-cantly l ess likely to smoke than are Aborigi-nal people.

Almost one-third of Aboriginal respondents to a survey in believed that it was Cited by:   The Cairns inhalant action group (CIAG) is an urban program focused on VSU among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, which was formed in in response to an increase in local inhalant use [].

The group was coordinated by Wuchopperen Health Service, an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled health. Introduction Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience high rates of substance use and related harms.

Previous prevention programmes and policies have met with limited success, particularly among youth, and this may be a result of inadequately targeting the unique risk and protective factors associated with substance use for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander : Mieke Snijder, Briana Lees, James Ward, Annalee E Stearne, Nicola Clare Newton, Lexine Stapinski.

Introduction. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Aboriginal) people are Australia’s first peoples and have a strong and resilient history (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, ; Commonwealth of Australia).Compared with non-Aboriginal people, Aboriginal people have poorer health and economic outcomes including higher rates of chronic and communicable diseases and unemployment Cited by: 4.

Indigenous Australians are both convicted of crimes and imprisoned at a disproportionately high rate in Australia, as well as being over-represented as victims of issue is a complex one, to which federal and state governments as well as Indigenous groups have responded with various analyses and numerous programs and measures.

As of SeptemberAboriginal and Torres Strait. Welcome to the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre. Our mission is contribute to improving the health of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and assist in ‘closing the gap’ by providing the evidence base to help reduce the harmful use of alcohol and other drugs.

The more recent evidence suggests that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities are increasingly engaged in addressing the issue of alcohol misuse.

This is the most important element for programs to reduce alcohol-related harm among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Strempel,et al, ).

a strong preference by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for family members to be cared for by their own (Carroll et al., ; McGrath, ). There are sometimes cultural rules. Objective: This mixed methods study aimed to develop and test a brief pictorial motivational intervention for Indigenous people with mental illness, which can be delivered in remote settings.

For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and acknowledges their rich diversity of culture. Methods: This study was conducted in. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (Aboriginal) account for approximately 3% of the Australian population.

They have the poorest health, economic and social outcomes. Higher notification rates of hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV) have been reported among Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal by: 8.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have been increasing among Australian Indigenous young people for over two decades. Little is known about the association between alcohol and other drug use and sexual risk behaviours and diagnosis of STIs among this population.

A cross-sectional, community based self-administered survey was conducted among young Aboriginal people aged Cited by: 8. Want to share information on medicines with people who have low levels of English literacy.

The Medicines Book for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners (MED) is intended to be used with standard treatment guidelines such as the CARPA Standard Treatment Manual (STM) and Women's Business Manual (WBM). Background. In Australia, young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter Aboriginal) people are disproportionately represented in sexually transmissible infections (STI) notification data [].Representing just 3 % of the total population, yet accounting for 38 and 16 % of all gonorrhoea and chlamydia notifications inthere remains an enormous gap between Aboriginal and non Cited by: 8.

Alcohol use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people needs to be understood within the social and historical context of colonisation, dispossession of land and culture, and economic exclusion.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are about times more likely to abstain from alcohol than non-Indigenous people. Not much research has looked at whether school-based prevention programs work to reduce drug and alcohol use and related harms among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students, particularly for those delivered in classrooms with students from a range of cultural backgrounds.

Research is currently underway to explore this. Pdf. Victims of assault that were using alcohol at the time of the pdf injury are at much greater risk of recurrent trauma in non-Indigenous population [].High risk alcohol consumption is also linked with family conflict, domestic violence and assaults among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [12,13].Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have higher rates of injury Cited by:   Across Australia, around % of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 15 years and over report using methamphetamines in the past year.

This .A National Ebook and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Drug Strategy Working Group (the Working Group) was established under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Committee on Drugs (the body with governance responsibility for the NDS) to develop this Strategy.